Tag Archives: vitamin D

10 Reasons Winter Running is Awesome

I try to offer balanced content on this blog so forgive me while I take a moment to post yet another exercise-themed article. This week it occurred to me that I don’t have much time left to write this post! The reason? Winter is almost over! Before you know it, you might miss out on the chance to enjoy winter running before the most popular running season hits (the spring!). Running in the winter is way underrated but it’s actually my favorite season for it! Here are 10 reasons why it’s so awesome:

 

 

1) Temperature Regulation is Easier

I get so hot running in the summer. Even when I’m carrying a Camelback and gels I can’t stand it. My runs are abruptly cut short and I pay the price several times a year from heat exhaustion or heat sensitivity. But not in the winter, baby! I love the fact that winter running involves layering because temperature regulation is so much easier when you can take off a headband and expose your ears to the cold. I like going out in a puffer vest over a long-sleeved, fitted Lululemon jacket. When I get too hot I simply unzip the vest or take my hands out of those cute fold-over mittens that Lululemon designs for some of their jackets (the ones that sometimes say “cold hands, warm heart”). I find that “unlayering” during my winter runs allows me to better regulate my temperature as I get hot and I can run for much longer than usual. Give it a try!

 

2) Less Dehydration

Of course you can become dehydrated from winter running although it’s far less common than running in the heat and humidity. So, yay for that! Winter running scores another point!

 

3) Easier to Run for Distance

As I mentioned in #1, the ability to layer up and remove said layers as needed makes winter running easier. For example, in the summer when you strip down to a sports bra and you’re still too hot you don’t have many options left. Agreed? The lower risk of dehydration also makes it easier to run longer with less fatigue. Another sneaky reason it’s easier to run for longer might be because it’s just so refreshing to finally be outside after long hours indoors! Which brings me to the next feather in winter’s cap…

 

4) Antidote for Cabin Fever

Does anyone else get as crazy as I do after a couple days trapped indoors? I mean, ditching the kids with my husband for an hour of fresh air is well worth the energy expenditure required for a good run. Kid free on Saturday morning? Yes please! It’s basically a dream.

 

5) Protect Against Depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder

On a more serious note, research shows that people who both exercise regularly and get outdoors have the best chances to beat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). The Summit Medical Group states that “many people can manage or avoid SAD with 30 to 60 minutes of exercise and 20 minutes of exposure to sunlight each day.” Outdoor running in the winter checks BOTH of those boxes!

 

 

6) Boost Vitamin D

Vitamin D is often called the “sunshine vitamin” so it’s little surprise that we get less of it during the winter. Getting outside for a run helps you boost this vitamin in your body, aiding in disease prevention and weight loss. It also helps you prevent bone fractures and fight depression. This is the power of the sun! Even a 10-20 minute walk on your lunch break can be beneficial.

 

7) Take Advantage of Those Rare Warm Winter Days

Ever notice how many people are outside on a Saturday in January or February that is unseasonably and blissfully warm? It’s like seeing one ant creeping towards a crumb and knowing that within minutes there will be hundreds crawling all over it. People thrive off being outdoors. It’s part of our human DNA and what makes us healthy! Staying in shape on the less enticing, more frigid days of winter makes it easier to get out and take full advantage of exercise, hiking and sports on the ones that surprise us and feel like spring.

 

8) Enjoy Winter Sports

If you’re a fan of skiing, snowboarding or another kind of winter sport then staying in shape is important and might even impact your safety! Although running doesn’t perfectly translate into going down a snowy mountain on skis free of your legs burning, it does help your core and hips stay strong. It also keeps up your cardio stamina!

 

9) Beat the Last-Minute Stress of Getting in Shape for Summer

So many people start thinking about getting in shape for the summer come April or May but that’s when lots of families and students start taking spring break trips – and it’s merely a month or two before Memorial Day and summer vacations begin. This doesn’t leave much time to get into a regular routine with exercise. Getting a jump on exercise in the dreary, post-holiday winter months is a great way to get a head start on your “beach bod” before summertime and margaritas take it away again (kidding…sort of).

 

10) Prep for Spring Races

Spring races usually begin late-March and go through early June. If you want to run a race in April then you’ve got to start training during the winter, regardless of the dissimilar weather conditions. Signing up for a spring race is a great way to set a goal during wintertime and have something to look forward to in the spring besides just patio and rooftop happy hours. 

 

 

I hope you enjoy the end of winter with some invigorating running – or even walking! You will feel amazing if you can motivate to get out there in the cold temperatures. You won’t regret it! Just be careful of ice…

 

Yours in health and wellness,

Maggie

 

 

 

5 Ways Our Bodies Are Connected to The Earth

Funny thing…an uptick in arguments with my husband every Fall led me to wonder if tension was high just because of football season (sad but true) or if there was more to the story. I did a little digging and learned that our hormones are connected to seasonal changes in surprising ways. I also discovered multiple more ways that our bodies are connected to the earth and how we can improve wellness by forming a relationship with Mother Nature herself.

 

 

Seasonal Hormonal Changes

Apparently, like many mammals, we humans have what some scientists call a “mating season.” August and September hold the highest birth rates of any months in the calendar year, meaning that nine months earlier…people are getting busy. That puts November and December as the months with the highest rates of conception. Some evolutionary theorists believe this is because our bodies are fine-tuned to have babies in months where their survival is best…aka, not in the freezing cold temperatures of our prehistoric cave homes.

This “peak” fertility is thanks to a rise in testosterone in the autumn months. And it’s not just men who experience this (just in time for football season, I add with an eye roll), it’s also a phenomenon in women. While I can’t say that the fertility theory has proven true in my life (both my babies started baking in the spring), I will say that I’ve always wondered how and why my clients always seem to have the most energy for their workouts in the Fall months. I guess now I know why…

 

 

Green Space & Mental Health

There’s a theory in psychology called the hedonic treadmill. The theory assumes that each individual is prone to a certain baseline of happiness, to which they routinely return despite positive and negative changes and life circumstances. This theory has been debunked by one study evaluating people’s overall mental health when relocating to spaces with more nature and green space.

Even after accounting for income, employment, education, and more, the study shows that “people in greener areas showed markedly better mental health scores compared to the two years prior to moving. This is a metric that not only includes stress levels and the ability to concentrate, but also the ability to make good decisions, a person’s level of confidence, overall happiness and other factors.”

I can personally say that I feel more zen with some green around me, for sure. But I don’t think you have to move to the country to accomplish this (if you were born to be a city person). Urban green spaces may have the potential to help combat depression and anxiety.

 

 

The Sun Connection

We’ve long heard of the benefits of sun exposure for our vitamin D levels. Vitamin D is crucial for bone health and appears to play a role in preventing Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes, hypertension, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), cardiovascular disease, and more (people living at higher latitudes with less sun exposure have greater incidences of these conditions). Many of us have even heard about how sunlight helps us regulate wake/sleep cycles, especially when we get sunlight in the morning and, as a result, our melatonin production kicks in earlier in the evening to help us with sleep. But there are even more benefits of the sun… (!!!)

Sunshine may help autoimmune diseases thanks to immunosuppressive effects following exposure. It also helps limit oxidative DNA damage while increasing gene repair. As if that’s not fascinating enough, get this –  UV Radiation can increase blood levels of natural opiates (aka. endorphins, those feel-good hormones)! Pretty compelling evidence to find a balance between protecting oneself from sun damage and getting enough exposure to it!

 

 

Brain Waves & Nature Sounds

There are many scientists who believe that our brain wave patterns evolved in response to the natural world’s frequencies and electromagnetic fields. In many studies, brain waves respond positively to nature sounds (ex: a babbling brook, ocean waves, rain fall, etc.), demonstrating an increase in waves associated with rest and digestion. In one particular study, researchers found that natural sounds elicited an “outward-directed focus of attention” for people’s brains whereas artificial sounds caused an “inward-directed focus of attention,” similar to a rise of in anxiety/depression or the experience of post-traumatic stress. Perhaps most interesting is that researchers found that people with higher anxiety or depression showed the strongest positive response to nature sounds. In short, if you’re feeling blue, reconnect with the world around you. Pause and listen. Relax and release.

 

 

The Practice of Grounding

Grounding is the practice of letting your body be in touch with nature. This may include sitting on the ground under a tree, walking barefoot through the grass or sand, or sleeping outdoors. There are many examples. Some people even say that walking barefoot on ceramic tile and concrete counts since these are made from natural materials. In short, grounding is connecting ourselves with the earth and its electron flow. Feeling skeptical? Just wait, there’s evidence this helps our health…

People who “ground themselves” often report feelings of well-being, citing that they feel less stressed and more strong. Outside of this subjective feedback, several scientific studies have been conducted to test these “grounding theories.” It has been scientifically proven that grounding can improve circulation, reduce pain, and improve sleep by helping normalize diurnal rhythms of the stress hormone cortisol! Time to ditch the shoes! 

 

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The point is simple: We are bound to this earth in more ways than one. When we embrace these connections we can achieve higher wellness.

 

Yours in health and wellness,

Maggie